Giving New Jersey's Wildlife a Second Chance
















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Wildlife Watch

We are testing new equipment! Scroll down for live stream. Please enjoy this live wildlife cam, inspired by Mike and the many requests by you to"please continue cams". Thank you! Let us know what you think on our chat below or via email at wildlife_rehab@yahoo.com.

Wildlife Watch! Providing a glimpse into the world of wildlife rehabilitation. Join us for an in depth view into the care of our wild patients during their care at Woodlands Wildlife Refuge. Species featured will change so be sure to check back often! Please keep in mind that these animals are not pets and are in the process of being cared for with the goal of release back into the wild. ( Please note we are not responsible for bodily functions that appear on camera. All enclosures are cleaned during scheduled care).

LIVE NOW on Cam 1: Woodchuck Cam

You are now watching an adult woodchuck! This one came to us in October after "he" did not run off when approached by people (or move at all for that matter). We commonly see this as a symptom of a concussion. Wildlife in our area suffer concussions most often after being clipped by a car. A full physical examination showed this woodchuck appeared fully healthy so we believe concussion to be the cause. "He" will remain in our care until Spring when we hope to release back into the wild.

Did you know?

-all reproductive organs are internal (hence the quotes on the "he")
-3rd largest rodent in NJ (after beaver and porcupine)
-active during the day
-live in fields and pastures with surrounding woodlands
-climb trees!
-dig borrows with multiple entrances and rooms
-true hibernators in winter (although they can still wake to use "bathroom")
-mate in March and April
-have 4-6 young in a litter
-herbivorous

LIVE NOW on Cam 2: Bear Cubs Cam

Woodlands is currently caring for seven bear cubs. We are testing our first outdoor camera with this stream. Please note this is only half of our large bear enclosure where rehabilitating bears enjoy many natural elements such as a pond, stream, climbing structures, and natural denning areas. They will be well cared for and prepared for release at their natural age of independence. This is the time of year that cub orphaning may happen for a variety of reasons as they are newly out of the den and following the mother through our highly human populated areas. As with all wild young thought to be in need - please call for advice before attempting rescuing. This way we can be sure the best and safest action is taken for you and the animal. Woodlands Wildlife Refuge may be reached at 908 730 8300 x 4 for questions about orphaned cubs as well as other mammal and reptile species native to New Jersey.


Woodlands started NJ's black bear rehabilitation and release program in 1995 and has cared for over 100 bears. Our highly successful program is recognized internationally and most recently included in published research. Did you know?- Black bears are not true hibernators and may be active all year long. During the winter, black bears enter a state of winter dormancy called torpor. While in the state of torpor their heart rate and respiratory rate slow and their body temperature slightly drops, but not as much as in true hibernators (such as chipmunks or woodchucks).- Black bears are the largest land mammal in New Jersey. Adult female bears, called sows, weigh about 175 pounds. Adult male bears, called boars, weigh around 400 pounds. Black bears are about 3 feet high when standing on all four feet and 5 to 7 feet tall when standing upright!- Despite their name, black bears show a great deal of color variation. Individual coat colors can range from white, blond, cinnamon, or light brown to dark chocolate brown or to jet black, with many intermediate variations existing. Bluish tinged black bears occur along a portion of coastal Alaska and British Columbia.- Some black bears may develop a white “crescent moon” mark (blaze) on the chest. This occurs in only 25% of American black bears.- Black bears tend to be solitary animals, with the exception of mothers and cubs. The bears usually forage alone, but will tolerate each other and forage in groups if there is an abundance of food in one area.

 

Cam 1: Woodchuck Cam
Video Streaming Software
Cam 2: Outdoor Bear Enclosure

Your tax deductible donation will be applied as follows:

The cam fund will go towards equipment, tech services, website maintenance, and all other things supporting your live cam experience!

Additional donations will be applied to our everyday needs.

Woodlands receives no state or federal funding

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Thank you to our cam sponsors:

KASTIA Foundation

Winton Foundation For The Welfare of Bears
Constellation - An Exelon Company

So Delicious Dairy Free


Thank You! To The Pet Channel TV for tech support
Visit them at : http://petlivestreams.com/

Cam Fund Donors and Shout Outs:

Elaine
Suzanne J.
Hudson45

Carol Shaw
In Memory of Mollie from Hudson45
In Honor of Daria on behalf of anonymous
"in honor of WWR's Gloved Angels." (Anonymous)
In Honor of Helen the squirrel
In Honor of Chanie on behalf of anonymous
In Honor of dfw121643 on behalf of anonymous
In Honor of Christina3 on behalf of anonymous
In Honor of LadyBug on behalf of anonymous
In Honor of JM181 on behalf of anonymous
In Honor of JackiesMom on behalf of anonymous
In Honor of Lynne N. on behalf of anonymous
In Honor of Leigh on behalf of anonymous
In Honor of Sinderella777 on behalf of anonymous
In Honor of Danny and Hannah on behalf of anonymous
In Memory of Nacho on behalf of MFC
In Honor of Coyboy on behalf of anonymous
In Honor of Andre Malok on behalf of MFC
In Honor of Andre and Bumper on behalf of MFC
In Honor of WWR on behalf of MFC
In Honor of JustKatinNH on behalf of anonymous
In Memory of Buddy on behalf of MFC
In Honor of MFC'ers and WWR staff on behalf of Suzanne J

In Memory of Allen Gibson on behalf of MFC

In Honor of Leigh on behalf of MFC

In Honor of Lapapillon on behalf of MFC

In Memory of Mei Ling on behalf of MFC

In honor of Joan Gibson on behalf of MFC
Mikey's Shamrock Band
In Honor of Ellis on behalf of MFC
In Honor of Robert Gibson on behalf of Constance Gibson
In Honor of MFC's Pets on behalf of Anonymous
In Honor of WWR Volunteers on behalf of Anonymous
In Honor of Bear Lover on behalf of MFC
In Memory of Danny Boy on behalf of MFC
In Honor of MFC on behalf of Ellie and Monkey
To my Anjelize2u/Kim Love always your Mike
In Honor of Wilbur and Teddy on behalf of MFC
In honor of our silent MFCers on behalf of active MFCers
In honor of WWR on behalf of Mikey
In Memory of Mikey & Wilbur on behalf of MFC
In honor of MFC
In Honor of WWR on behalf of Mike the Bear
With Heartfelt Thanks to WWR, Love - Mike the Bear
In honor of WWR and MFC family
In honor of Hilly, Donnie, Bearnie, Ted, Jeb, & Bearrack on behalf of MFC
In memory of Guinness on behalf of JustKatinNH
On Behalf of Margo For Animals
In Honor of Jackie, with gratitude, on behalf of Anonymous
In Honor of Andre Malok, Joan, Barb, Barbara Harry, Christina A, Christina B, Kathleen, Leigh, Mary, Sue and most importantly Tracy, Melissa, Heather, WWR Interns & Volunteers., on behalf of Anonymous
In memory of Pedals the Bear on behalf of MFC
In honor of Anonymous on behalf of MFC
In honor of Ally on behalf of MFC
In honor of Jeanie on behalf of MFC
In loving memory of Janie on behalf of MFC

 

 

Wildlife Discussion

 

 


Wild patients streaming live!

 

In Memory of Mike


Address: 676 County Road 513 Pittstown, NJ 08867 P: 908-730-8300 F: 908-730-8311 Email: wildlife_rehab@yahoo.com

Tax ID: 22-3053310 Contents ©2017 Woodlands Wildlife Refuge. All rights reserved.